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OB has already enlightened me.
#1
I have made a few purchases on OB and I just love the fact I can order something from someone across the globe, the money goes DIRECTLY to them, and I can experience things that I normally wouldn't be able to.

An example would be I ordered some Riceberry from Thailand. If I were to order this on amazon.com it would cost me $35-50 depending on the source, as well as pay for shipping since most of them are not prime.

I was able to get a brick of it, along with some extra swag the buyer threw in, for only $30, and that INCLUDED the shipping. Cutting out the middleman apparently saves money, who knew!

Now I am able to experience a strain of rice and some culture from across the globe, from the comfort of my own home, all while helping someone who has the foresight to try to be an entrepreneur in this global marketplace.

On a larger scale, imagine what world disaster relief organizations could do where rather than trust your money to a few, list all the items to buy, water, blankets, medical supplies etc, and then you could directly purchase/help an area with bitcoin knowing where your money is going.

Rather than donate to a charity, buy something directly from someone living in the area who is actually offering a product or service. This encourages more adoption in those areas and you as an individual can impact someone's live far greater directly, than through a charity organization. (I'm not bashing all charities, there just tends to be abuse/waste in the larger ones).
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#2
I had a similar enlightenment. It was back in March last year. I found OpenBazaar because I had spent about 2 years trying to find ways for friends in Africa to sell stuff online. It wasn't ready but I joined the beta testing team, and we were using a testcoin faucet to get some funds to 'buy' stuff off each other. That brought me to bitcoin faucets.

My first transaction was 1000 satoshis from a bitcoin faucet. It was a revelation that took a minute or two to sink in. I opened up a page, it said 'enter your bitcoin address'. I entered it. It said 'solve captcha' - I did. Then it gave me 1000 satoshi. That was it, transaction done! Well, there's a slightly longer story because it was such a small amount, but that's it really.

It was a real financial transaction, with no ID, they didn't even want to know my name. Some time and a lot of faucets later I made my first purchase; a domain from domainsforbitcoins.com. This was also surprisingly easy. They just wanted me to select the domain I wanted, fill out the whois record details and then... payment. Guess what they wanted? Yes, nothing. They just presented me with a bitcoin address and said send exactly x BTC to this address. I did, and before I even closed my wallet, the page automatically refreshed with my payment showing.

After that, it took a few minutes to be confirmed, but essentially that's how easy it was.

Subsequently, when I have to use a credit card to buy something I experience an almost unique and very intense frustration. There's only one other time I have felt it. Back when I was living in Brighton I rode a bike everywhere. I could get anywhere in town in a couple of minutes, and most places up to a few miles away were within easy reach. The only problem came when I had to get off and walk somewhere. Suddenly walking seemed really slow and stupid.

The old money is really slow and stupid - and expensive. And clumsy. We have to get rid of it. It's a 60-pound tumor on our backs.

Gandhi said, you must be the change you want to see in the world, and I think the new currencies provide us with a wealth of new ways to do just that.

Andy
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#3
(02-14-2017, 02:07 AM)andy Wrote: Subsequently, when I have to use a credit card to buy something I experience an almost unique and very intense frustration. There's only one other time I have felt it. Back when I was living in Brighton I rode a bike everywhere. I could get anywhere in town in a couple of minutes, and most places up to a few miles away were within easy reach. The only problem came when I had to get off and walk somewhere. Suddenly walking seemed really slow and stupid.

Andy

I like this analogy and it is how I feel when having to use a credit card to buy something online nowadays. Entering all the fields, making sure they didn't save my information on their servers, hoping my card doesn't get stolen, I feel 10x more secure with bitcoin and entering an amount and 1 address is much simpler than filling out 10 fields.
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